[ABRIDGED VERSION of the Fifth Edition of The Nursery Rhymes of England. This consists solely of the poems which cannot be found in, or which have differences with, the First Edition and the Fourth Edition.]

preface, left facing

preface right facing


p.i ]



THE NURSERY RHYMES

OF

E N G L A N D.



BY
J A M E S  O R C H A R D  H A L L I W E L L.



WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY W.  B.  SCOTT.



title page graphic



LONDON AND NEW YORK:
F R E D E R I C K  W A R N E  A N D  C O.
1886.



p.iii ]



preface page graphic

P R E F A C E

TO THE

F I F T H  E D I T I O N.


T
HE great encouragement which has been given by the public to the previous editions of this little work, satisfactorily proves that, notwithstanding the extension of serious education to all but the very earliest periods of life, there still exists an undying love for the popular remnants of the ancient Scandinavian nursery literature. The infants and children of the nineteenth century have not, then, deserted the rhymes chanted so many ages since by the mothers of the North. This is a "great nursery fact"—a proof that there is contained in some of p.iv / these traditional nonsense-rhymes a meaning and a romance, possibly intelligible only to very young minds, that exercise an influence on the fancy of children. It is obvious there must exist something of this kind; for no modern compositions are found to supply altogether the place of the ancient doggrel.
      The nursery rhyme is the novel and light reading of the infant scholar. It occupies, with respect to the A B C, the position of a romance which relieves the mind from the cares of a riper age. The absurdity and frivolity of a rhyme may naturally be its chief attractions to the very young; and there will be something lost from the imagination of that child, whose parents insist so much on matters of fact, that the "cow" must be made, in compliance with the rules of their educational code, to jump "under" instead of "over the moon;" while of course the little dog must be considered as "barking," not "laughing" at the circumstance.

p.v /
      These, or any such objections,—for it seems there are others of about equal weight,—are, it appears to me, more silly than the worst nursery rhyme the little readers will meet with in the following pages. I am quite willing to leave the question to their decision, feeling assured the catering for them has not been in vain, and that these cullings from the high-ways and bye-ways—they have been collected from nearly every county in England—will be to them real flowers, soothing the misery of many an hour of infantine adversity.


p.vii ]


Contents page, child with soap bubble


C O N T E N T S.
PAGE
FIRST CLASS—HISTORICAL..1
SECOND CLASS—LITERAL..14
THIRD CLASS—TALES..22
FOURTH CLASS—PROVERBS..68
FIFTH CLASS—SCHOLASTIC..76
SIXTH CLASS—SONGS...82
SEVENTH CLASS—RIDDLES..119
EIGHTH CLASS—CHARMS...135
NINTH CLASS—GAFFERS AND GAMMERS   141
TENTH CLASS—GAMES...154

p.viii /

PAGE
ELEVENTH CLASS—PARADOXES....196
TWELFTH CLASS—LULLABIES..205
THIRTEENTH CLASS—JINGLES..213
FOURTEENTH CLASS—LOVE AND MATRIMONY ..224
FIFTEENTH CLASS—NATURAL HISTORY .251
SIXTEENTH CLASS—ACCUMULATIVE STORIES 282
SEVENTEENTH CLASS—LOCAL..299
EIGHTEENTH CLASS—RELICS .303
INDEX ..... 317



p.1  ]


FIRST CLASS—HISTORICAL.


I.
O
LD King Cole
Was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe,
And he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.
Every fiddler, he had a fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he ;
Twee tweedle dee, tweedle dee, went the fiddlers.
Oh, there's none so rare,
As can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three !

    The traditional Nursery Rhymes of England commence with a legendary satire on King Cole, who reigned in Britain, as the old chroniclers inform p.2 / us, in the third century after Christ. According to Robert of Gloucester, he was the father of St. Helena, and if so, Butler must be wrong in ascribing an obscure origin to the celebrated mother of Constantine. King Cole was a brave and popular man in his day, and ascended the throne of Britain on the death of Asclepiod, amidst the acclamations of the people, or, as Robert of Gloucester expresses himself, the "fcle was tho of this long y-paid wel y-nou." At Colchester there is a large earthwork, supposed to have been a Roman amphitheatre, which goes popularly by the name of "King Cole's kitchen." According to Jeffrey of Monmouth, King Cole's daughter was well skilled in music, but we unfortunately have no evidence to show that her father was attached to that science, further than what is contained in the foregoing lines, which are of doubtful antiquity. The following version of the song is of the seventeenth century, the one given above being probably a modernization :—
Good King Cole,
He call'd for his bowl,
And he call'd for fidlers three:
And there was fiddle fiddle,
And twice fiddle fiddle,
For 'twas my lady's birth-day;
Therefore we keep holiday,
And come to be merry.]

p.6 /
X.
     [Another version. The nurse sings the first line, and repeats it, time after time, until the expectant little one asks, what next ? Then comes the climax.]
THE king of France, the king of France, with forty thousand men,
Oh, they all went up the hill, and so—came back again!


p.7 /

XIII.
GOOD Queen Bess was a glorious dame,
When bonny King Jemmy from Scotland came;
We'll pepper their bodies,
Their peaceable noddies,
And give them a crack of the crown!


XIV.
     [The word tory has changed greatly in its meaning, as it originated in the reign of Elizabeth, and represented a class of "bog-trotters," who were a compound of the knave and the highwayman. For many interesting particulars see Crofton Croker's 'Researches in the South of Ireland,' 4to, 1824, p.52.]
HO! Master Teague, what is your story?
I went to the wood and kill'd a tory;
I went to the wood and kill'd another;
Was it the same, or was it his brother?

I hunted him in, and I hunted him out,
Three times through the bog, about and about;
When out of a bush I saw his head,
So I fired my gun, and I shot him dead.


p.8 /

XVII.
OVER the water, and over the lee,
And over the water to Charley.
Charley loves good ale and wine,
And Charley loves good brandy,
And Charley loves a pretty girl,
As sweet as sugar-candy.

Over the water, and over the sea,
And over the water to Charley,
I'll have none of your nasty beef,
Nor I'll have none of your barley;
But I'll have some of your very best flour;
To make a white cake for my Charley.


p.9 /

XXI.
HECTOR PROTECTOR was dressed all in green;
Hector Protector was sent to the Queen.
The Queen did not like him,
Nor more did the King:
So Hector Protector was sent back again.


p.11 /

XXV.
[A song on King William the Third.]
AS I walk'd by myself,
And talked to myself,
   Myself said unto me,
Look to thyself,
Take care of thyself,
   For nobody cares for thee.

I answer'd myself,
And said to myself
   In the self-same repartee,
Look to thyself,
Or not look to thyself,
   The self-same thing will be.


p.13 /


p.14 ]


SECOND CLASS—LITERAL.



p.15 /

XXXV.
ONE'S none;
Two's some;
Three's a many;
Four's a penny;
Five is a little hundred.


p.20 /

XLIV.
A for the ape, that we saw at the fair;
B for a blockhead, who ne'er shall go there;
C for a collyflower, white as a curd;
D for a duck, a very good bird;
E for an egg, good in pudding or pies;
F for a farmer, rich, honest, and wise;
G for a gentleman, void of all care;
H for the hound, that ran down the hare;
I for an Indian, sooty and dark;
K for the keeper, that look'd to the park;
L for a lark, that soar'd in the air;
M for a mole, that ne'er could get there;
N for Sir Nobody, ever in fault;
O for an otter, that ne'er could be caught;
P for a pudding, stuck full of plums;
Q was for quartering it, see here he comes;
R for a rook, that croak'd in the trees;
S for a sailor, that plough'd the deep seas;
p.21 /
T for a top, that doth prettily spin;
V for a virgin of delicate mien;
W for wealth, in gold, silver, and pence;
X for old Xenophone, noted for sense;
Y for a yew, which for ever is green;
Z for the zebra, that belongs to the queen.


Beehive


p.22 ]

Illustrates poem XLV, 'The Story of Catskin'

THIRD CLASS—TALES.

p.36 /

LIII.
THERE was a man, and he had naught,
   And robbers came to rob him;
He crept up to the chimney pot,
   And then they thought they had him.

But he got down on t'other side,
   And then they could not find him;
He ran fourteen miles in fifteen days,
   And never look'd behind him.


p.37 /

LV.
THE STORY OF THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.

      ONCE upon a time there was an old sow with three little pigs, and as she had not enough to keep them, she sent them out to seek their fortune. The first that went off met a man with a bundle of straw, and said to him, "Please, man, give me that straw to build me a house;" which the man did, and the little pig built a house with it. Presently came along a wolf, and knocked at the door, and said,—
     "Little pig, little pig, let me come in."
     To which the pig answered,—
     "No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin shin."
     The wolf then answered to that,—
     "Then I'll huff and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in."
     So he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew his house in, and eat up the little pig.
     The second little pig met a man with a bundle of furze, and said, "Please, man, give me that furze to build a house;" which the man did, and the pig built his house. Then along came the wolf, and said, —

p.38 /
     "Little pig, little pig, let me come in."
     "No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin."
     "Then I'll puff, and I'll huff, and I'll blow your house in."
     So he huffed, and he puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and at last he blew the house down, and he eat up the little pig.
     The third little pig met a man with a load of bricks, and said, "Please, man, give me those bricks to build a house with;" so the man gave him the bricks, and he built his house with them. So the wolf came, as he did to the other little pigs, and said,—
     "Little pig, little pig, let me come in."
     "No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin."
     "Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in."
      Well, he huffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and he puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed; but he could not get the house down. When he found that he could not, with all his huffing and puffing, blow the house down, he said, "Little pig, I know where there is a nice field of turnips." "Where?" said the little pig.
p.39 /
     "Oh, in Mr. Smith's Home-field, and if you will be ready to-morrow morning I will call for you, and we will go together, and get some for dinner." "Very well," said the little pig, "I will be ready. What time do you mean to go?" "Oh, at six o'clock." Well, the little pig got up at five, and got the turnips before the wolf came — (which he did about six) — and who said, "Little pig, are you ready?" The little pig said, "Ready! I have been, and come back again, and got a nice pot-full for dinner." The wolf felt very angry at this, but thought that he would be up to the little pig somehow or other, so he said, "Little pig, I know where there is a nice apple-tree." "Where?" said the pig. "Down at Merry-garden," replied the wolf, "and if you will not deceive me I will come for you, at five o'clock to-morrow, and we will go together and get some apples." Well, the little pig bustled up the next morning at four o'clock, and went off for the apples, hoping to get back before the wolf came; but he had further to go, and had to climb the tree, so that just as he was coming down from it, he saw the wolf coming, which, as you may suppose, frightened him very much. When p.40 / the wolf came up he said, "Little pig, what! are you here before me? Are they nice apples?" "Yes, very," said the little pig. "I will throw you down one;" and he threw it so far, that, while the wolf was gone to pick it up, the little pig jumped down and ran home. The next day the wolf came again, and said to the little pig, "Little pig, there is a fair at Shanklin this afternoon, will you go?" "Oh yes," said the pig, "I will go; what time shall you be ready?" "At three," said the wolf. So the little pig went off before the time as usual, and got to the fair, and bought a butter-churn, which he was going home with, when he saw the wolf coming. Then he could not tell what to do. So he got into the churn to hide, and by so doing turned it round, and it rolled down the hill with the pig in it, which frightened the wolf so much, that he ran home without going to the fair. He went to the little pig's house, and told him how frightened he had been by a great round thing which came down the hill past him. Then the little pig said, "Hah, I frightened you then. I had been to the fair and bought a butter-churn, and when I saw you, I got into it, p.41 / and rolled down the hill." Then the wolf was very angry indeed, and declared he would eat up the little pig, and that he would get down the chimney after him. When the little pig saw what he was about, he hung on the pot full of water, and made up a blazing fire, and, just as the wolf was coming down, took off the cover, and in fell the wolf; so the little pig put on the cover again in an instant, boiled him up, and eat him for supper, and lived happy ever afterwards.


LVII
LITTLE King Boggen he built a fine hall.
Pye-crust, and pastry-crust, that was the wall;
The windows were made of black-puddings and white,
And slated with pancakes — you ne'er saw the like.


p.43 ]

Illustration for poem LXI, 'In Arthur's court Tom Thumb did live

p.60 /

LXVIII.
Old Abram Brown is dead and gone,
   You'll never see him more;
He used to wear a long brown coat,
   That button'd down before.


p.61 /

LXIX.
A DOG and a cock,
A journey once took,
   They travell'd along till 'twas late;
The dog he made free
In the hollow of a tree,
   And the cock on the boughs of it sate.

The cock nothing knowing,
In the morn fell a crowing,
   Upon which comes a fox to the tree;
Says he, I declare,
Your voice is above,
   All the creatures I ever did see.

Oh! would you come down
I the fav'rite might own,
   Said the cock, there's a porter below;
If you will go in,
I promise I'll come down.
   So he went — and was worried for it too.


LXX.
LITTLE Tom Tittlemouse,
Lived in a bell-house;
The bell-house broke,
And Tom Tittlemouse woke.


p.62 /
Illustration for poem LXXI, 'Tommy kept a chandler's shop

p.66 /

LXXVIII.
OUR saucy boy Dick,
Had a nice little stick
   Cut from a hawthorn tree;
And with this pretty stick,
He thought he could beat
   A boy much bigger than he.

But the boy turned round,
And hit him a rebound,
   Which did so frighten poor Dick,
That, without more delay,
He ran quite away,
   And over a hedge he jumped quick.


LXXIX.
MOSS was a little man, and a little mare did buy,
For kicking and for sprawling none her could come nigh;
p.67 /
She could trot, she could amble, and could canter here and there,
But one night she strayed away — so Moss lost his mare.

Moss got up next morning to catch her fast asleep,
And round about the frosty fields so nimbly he did creep.
Dead in a ditch he found her, and glad to find her there,
So I'll tell you by and bye, how Moss caught his mare.

Rise! stupid, rise! he thus to her did say;
Arise, you beast, you drowsy beast, get up without delay,
For I must ride you to the town, so don't lie sleeping there;
He put the halter round her neck — so Moss caught his mare.



p.68 ]

FOURTH CLASS—PROVERBS.


p.71 /

XC.
A MAN of words and not of deeds,
Is like a garden full of weeds;
For when the weeds begin to grow,
Then doth the garden overflow.


XCI.
IF you sneeze on Monday, you sneeze for danger;
Sneeze on a Tuesday, kiss a stranger;
Sneeze on a Wednesday, sneeze for a letter;
Sneeze on a Thursday, something better;
Sneeze on a Friday, sneeze for sorrow;
Sneeze on a Saturday, see your sweetheart to-morrow


XCII.
A PULLET in the pen
Is worth a hundred in the fen!


p.73 /

XCVII.
[In Suffolk, children are frequently reminded of the decorum due to the Sabbath by the following lines.]
YEOW mussent sing a' Sunday,
    Becaze it is a sin,
But yeow may sing a' Monday
    Till Sunday cums agin.


XCVIII.
A SUNSHINY shower,
Won't last half an hour.


XCIX.
AS the days grow longer,
The storms grow stronger.


C.
AS the days lengthen,
So the storms strengthen.


p.74 /

CI.
HE that goes to see his wheat in May,
Comes weeping away.


CII.
THE mackerel's cry,
Is never long dry.


CIII.
      IN July,
Some reap rye;
      In August,
If one will not the other must.


CIV.
   [Proverbial many years ago, when the guinea in gold was of a higher value than its nominal representative in silver.]
A GUINEA it would sink,
    And a pound it would float;
Yet I'd rather have a guinea,
    Than your one pound note.


p.75 /

CVI.
THE art of good driving 's a paradox quite,
    Though custom has prov'd it so long;
If you go to the left, you're sure to go right,
    If you go to the right, you go wrong.


CVII.
FRIDAY night's dream
    On the Saturday told,
Is sure to come true,
    Be it never so old.


CVIII.
WHEN the sand doth feed the clay,
England woe and well-a-day!
But when the clay doth feed the sand,
Then it is well with Angle-land.


CIX.
THE fair maid who, the first of May,
Goes to the fields at break of day,
And washes in dew from the hawthorn tree
Will ever after handsome be.


p.76 ]

FIFTH CLASS—SCHOLASTIC


p.77 /

CXIII.
[The dominical letters attached to the first days of the several months are remembered by the following lines.]
AT Dover Dwells George Brown Esquire,
Good Christopher Finch, and David Friar.

[An ancient and graver example, fulfilling the same purpose, runs as follows.]
Astra Dabit Dominus, Gratisque Beabit Egenos,
Gratia ChristicolŠ Feret Aurea Dona Fideli.


CXIV.
BIRCH and green holly, boys,
    Birch and green holly.
If you get beaten, boys,
    'Twill be your own folly.


p.78 /

CXV.
WHEN V and I together meet,
They make the number Six compleat.
When I with V doth meet once more,
Then 'tis they Two can make but Four
And when that V from I is gone,
Alas! poor I can make but One.


p.79 /

CXVIII.
MY story's ended,
My spoon is bended:
If you don't like it,
Go to the next door,
And get it mended.


CXIX.
    [On arriving at the end of a book, boys have a practice of reciting the following absurd lines, which form the word finis backwards and forwards, by the initials of the words,]—
FATHER Iohnson Nicholas Iohnson's son—
Son Iohnson Nicholas Iohnson's Father.
[To get to father Johnson, therefore, was to reach the end of the book.]


CXX.
THE rose is red, the grass is green;
And in this book my name is seen.


p.80 /

CXXII.
COME when you're called,
    Do what you're bid,
Shut the door after you,
    Never be chid.


CXXIII.
SPEAK when you're spoken to,
    Come when one call;
Shut the door after you,
    And turn to the wall!


CXXIV.
I LOVE my love with an A, because he's Agreeable.
I hate him because he's Avaricious.
He took me to the Sign of the Acorn,
And treated me with Apples.
His name's Andrew,
And he lives at Arlington.


CXXV.
[A laconic reply to a person who indulges much in supposition.]
      IF ifs and ands,
      Were pots and pans,
There would be no need for tinkers!


p.81 /

CXXVIII.
[A Greek bill of fare.]
LEGOMOTON,
Acapon,
Alfagheuse,
Pasti venison.


CXXIX.
WHEN I was a little boy, I had but little wit
It is some time ago, and I've no more yet;
Nor ever ever shall, until that I die,
For the longer I live, the more fool am I.


p.82 ]

SIXTH CLASS—SONGS


CXXX.
O
H where are you going,
    My pretty maiden fair,
With your red rosy cheeks,
    And your coal-black hair?
I'm going a-milking,
    Kind sir, says she;
And it's dabbling in the dew,
    Where you'll find me.

May I go with you,
    My pretty maiden fair, &c.
Oh, you may go with me,
    Kind sir, says she, &c.

p.83 /
If I should chance to kiss you,
    My pretty maiden fair, &c.
The wind may take it off again,
    Kind sir, says she, &c.

And what is your father,
    My pretty maiden fair, &c.
My father is a farmer,
    Kind sir, says she, &c.

And what is your mother,
    My pretty maiden fair, &c.
My mother is a dairy-maid,
    Kind sir, says she, &c.


CXXXI.
POLLY put the kettle on,
Polly put the kettle on,
Polly put the kettle on,
    And let's drink tea.

Sukey take it off again,
Sukey take it off again,
Sukey take it off again,
    They're all gone away.


p. 84 /

CXXXIII.
THE fox and his wife they had a great strife,
They never eat mustard in all their whole life;
They eat their meat without fork or knife,
      And loved to be picking a bone, e-ho!

The fox jumped up on a moonlight night;
The stars they were shining, and all things bright;
Oh, ho! said the fox, it's a very fine night
      For me to go through the town, e-ho!

The fox when he came to yonder stile,
He lifted his lugs and he listened a while!
Oh, ho! said the fox, it's but a short mile
      From this unto yonder wee town, e-ho

p.85 /
The fox when he came to the farmer's gate,
Who should he see but the farmer's drake;
I love you well for your master's sake,
      And long to be picking your bone, e-ho!

The gray goose she ran round the hay-stack,
Oh, ho! said the fox, you are very fat;
You'll grease my beard and ride on my back
      From this into yonder wee town, e-ho!

Old Gammer Hipple-hopple hopped out of bed,
She opened the casement, and popped out her head;
Oh! husband, oh! husband, the gray goose is dead,
      And the fox is gone through the town, oh!

Then the old man got up in his red cap,
And swore he would catch the fox in a trap;
But the fox was too cunning, and gave him the slip,
      And ran thro' the town, the town, oh!

When he got to the top of the hill,
He blew his trumpet both loud and shrill,
For joy that he was safe
      Thro' the town, oh!

/ p.86 /
When the fox came back to his den,
He had young ones both nine and ten,
"You're welcome home, daddy, you may go again,
If you bring us such nice meat
      From the town, oh!"


CXXXIV.

LITTLE Tom Dogget,
    What dost thou mean,
To kill thy poor Colly
    Now she's so lean?
Sing, oh poor Colly,
    Colly, my cow,
For Colly will give me
No more milk now.

I had better have kept her,
    'Till fatter she had been,
For now, I confess,
    She's a little too lean.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

First in comes the tanner
    With his sword by his side,
And he bids me five shillings
    For my poor cow's hide.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

p.87 /
Then in comes the tallow-chandler,
    Whose brains were but shallow,
And he bids me two-and-sixpence
    For my cow's tallow.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

Then in comes the huntsman
    So early in the morn,
He bids me a penny
    For my cow's horn.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

Then in comes the tripe-woman,
    So fine and so neat,
She beds me three half-pence
    For my cow's feet.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

Then in comes the butcher,
    That nimble-tongu'd youth,
Who said she was carrion,
    But he spoke not the truth.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

The skin of my cowly
    Was softer than silk,
And three times a-day
    My poor cow would give milk.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

p.88 /
She every year
    A fine calf did me bring,
Which fetcht me a pound,
    For it came in the spring.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

But now I have kill'd her,
    I can't her recall;
I will sell my poor Colly,
    Hide, horns, and all.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

The butcher shall have her,
    Though he gives but a pound,
And he knows in his heart
    That my Colly was sound.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.

And when he has bought her
    Let him sell all together,
The flesh for to eat,
    And the hide for leather.
Sing, oh poor Colly, &c.*

    *A different version of the above, commencing, My Billy Aroms, is current in the nurseries of Cornwall. One verse runs as follows:
In comes the horner,
    Who roguery scorns,
And gives me three farthings
    For poor cowly's horns.
This is better than our reading, and it concludes thus:
There's an end to my cowly,
    Now she's dead and gone;
For the loss of my cowly,
    I sob and I mourn.


p.90 /

Illustration for CXXXVIII, 'Sing a song of sixpence'

p.94 /

CXLIV.
Jeanie come tie my,
Jeanie come tie my,
Jeanie come tie my bonnie cravat;
I've tied it behind,
I've tied it before,
And I've tied it so often, I'll tie it no more.


p.97 /

CLI.
ELSIE Marley is grown so fine,
She won't get up to serve the swine,
But lies in bed till eight or nine,
And surely she does take her time.

And do you ken Elsie Marley, honey?
The wife who sells the barley, honey;
She won't get up to serve her swine,
And do you ken Elsie Marley, honey?

    [Elsie Marley is said to have been a merry alewife who lived near Chester, and the remainder of this song relating to her will be found in the 'Chester Garland,' 12mo, n.d. The first four lines have become favourites in the nursery.]


p.99 /

CLIII.
OLD Father of the Pye,
I cannot sing, my lips are dry;
But when my lips are very well wet,
Then I can sing with the Heigh go Bet!
[This appears to be an old hunting song. Go bet is a very ancient sporting phrase, equivalent to go along. It occurs in Chaucer, Leg. Dido, 288.]


p.101 /

This accompanies poem CLIV, 'Tom, he was a piper's son'

CLV.
JACKY, come give me thy fiddle,
    If ever thou mean to thrive:
Nay ; I'll not give my fiddle
    To any man alive.
p.102 /
If I should give my fiddle,
    They'll think that I'm gone mad;
For many a joyful day
    My fiddle and I have had.


p.104 /

CLIX.
MY maid Mary
She minds her dairy,
      While I go a hoing and mowing each morn,
Merrily run the reel
And the little spinning wheel
      Whilst I am singing and mowing my corn.


CLX.
      HOT-cross Buns!
      Hot-cross Buns!
One a penny, two a penny
      Hot-cross Buns!

      Hot-cross Buns!
      Hot-cross Buns!
If ye have no daughters,
      Give them to your sons.


p.107 /

CLXVI
THERE was a jolly miller
      Lived on the river Dee:
He worked and sung from morn till night,
      No lark so blithe as he,
And this the burden of his song
      For ever used to be—
I jump mejerrime jee!
      I care for nobody — no! not I,
Since nobody cares for me.


p.108 /

CLXIX.
     [Song on the bells of Derby on foot-ball morning, a custom now discontinued:]
Pancakes and fritters,
Say All Saints and St. Peters;
When will the ball come,
Says the bells of St. Alkmun;
At two they will throw,
Says Saint Werabo,
O! very well,
Says little Michel.


CLXX.
I HAVE been to market, my lady, my lady;
Then you've not been to the fair, says pussy, says pussy;
I bought me a rabbit, my lady, my lady,
Then you did not buy a hare, says pussy, says pussy;
p.109 /
I roasted it, my lady, my lady;
Then you did not boil it, says pussy, says pussy;
I eat it, my lady, my lady;
And I'll eat you, says pussy, says pussy.


CLXXI
MY father left me three acres of land,
    Sing ivy, sing ivy;
My father left me three acres of land,
    Sing holly, go whistle and ivy!

I ploughed it with a ram's horn,
    Sing ivy, sing ivy;
And sowed it all over with one pepper corn,
    Sing holly, go whistle and ivy!

I harrowed it with a bramble bush,
    Sing ivy, sing ivy;
And reaped it with my little penknife,
    Sing holly, go whistle and ivy!

I got the mice to carry it to the barn,
    Sing ivy, &c.
And thrashed it with a goose's quill,
    Sing holly, &c.

p.110 /
I got the cat to carry it to the mill,
    Sing ivy, &c.
The miller he swore he would have her paw,
And the cat she swore she would scratch his face,
    Sing holly, go whistle and ivy!


p.116 /

Illustration for poem CLXXVI, 'Hic hoc, the carrion crow'

p.117 /

CLXXX.
WHISTLE, daughter, whistle, whistle daughter dear;
I cannot whistle, mammy, I cannot whistle clear.
Whistle, daughter, whistle, whistle for a pound;
I cannot whistle, mammy, I cannot make a sound.


p.118 /

CLXXXI.
I'LL sing you a song,
Though not very long,
      Yet I think it as pretty as any;
Put your hand in your purse,
You'll never be worse,
      And give the poor singer a penny.


CLXXXII.
DAME, get up and bake your pies,
Bake your pies, bake your pies;
Dame, get up and bake your pies,
On Christmas-day in the morning.

Dame, what makes your maidens lie,
Maidens lie, maidens lie;
Dame, what makes your maidens lie,
On Christmas-day in the morning?

Dame, what makes your ducks to die,
Ducks to die, ducks to die;
Dame, what makes your ducks to die,
On Christmas-day in the morning?

Their wings are cut and they cannot fly,
Cannot fly, cannot fly;
Their wings are cut and they cannot fly,
On Christmas-day in the morning.


p.119 ]

Illustration for Seventh Class, riddles

SEVENTH CLASS— RIDDLES


CLXXXIV.
[A thorn]
I WENT to the wood and got it,
I sat me down and looked at it;
The more I looked at it the less I liked it,
And I brought it home because I couldn't help it.


p.120 /

CLXXXVI.
[A pen.]
WHEN I was taken from the fair body,
    They then cut off my head,
    And thus my shape was altered;
It's I that make peace between king and king,
    And many a true lover glad:
All this I do and ten times more,
    And more I could do still,
But nothing can I do,
    Without my guider's will.


p.121 /

CLXXXVIII.
[A tobacco-pipe.]
I WENT into my grandmother's garden,
And there I found a farthing.
I went into my next door neighbour's,
There I bought a pipkin and a popkin—
A slipkin and a slopkin,
A nailboard, a sailboard,
And all for a farthing.


CXC.
MADE in London,
Sold at York,
Stops a bottle
And is a cork.


CXCI.
TEN and ten and twice eleven,
Take out six and put in seven;
Go to the green and fetch eighteen,
And drop one a coming.


p.122 /

CXCII.
[A walnut.]
AS soft as silk, as white as milk,
As bitter as gall, a thick wall,
And a green coat covers me all.


p.129 /

CCXVII.
[The allusion to Oliver Cromwell satisfactorily fixes the date of the riddle to belong to the seventeenth century. The answer is, a rainbow.]
PURPLE, yellow, red, and green,
The king cannot reach it nor the queen;
Nor can old Noll, whose power's so great :
Tell me this riddle while I count eight.


p.134 /

CCXXXIII.
[An Icicle.]
LIVES in winter,
Dies in summer,
And grows with its root upwards!


p.135 ]

Illustration for Eighth Class, Charms
EIGHTH CLASS—CHARMS


p.139 /

CCXLVII.
    MY grandmother sent me a new-fashioned three cornered cambric country cut handkerchief. Not an old-fashioned three cornered cambric country cut handkerchief, but a new-fashioned three cornered cambric country cut handkerchief.


CCXLVIII.
    THREE crooked cripples went through Cripplegate, and through Cripplegate went three crooked cripples.


p.140 /

p.141 ]

Illustration for poem CCLII, 'There was an old woman, as I've heard tell'

NINTH CLASS—GAFFERS AND GAMMERS.


CCLII.
T
HERE was an old woman, as I've heard tell,
She went to market her eggs for to sell;
She went to market all on a market-day,
And she fell asleep on the king's highway.

There came by a pedlar whose name was Stout,
He cut her petticoats all round about;
He cut her petticoats up to the knees,
Which made the old woman to shiver and freeze.


p.142 /

When this little woman first did wake,
She began to shiver and she began to shake,
She began to wonder and she began to cry,
"Oh! deary, deary me, this is none of I !

"But if it be I, as I do hope it be,
I've a little dog at home, and he'll know me;
If it be I, he'll wag his little tail,
And if it be not I, he'll loudly bark and wail."

Home went the little woman all in the dark,
Up got the little dog, and he began to bark;
He began to bark, so she began to cry
"Oh! deary, deary me, this is none of I !


/ p.143 /

CCLIV.
OLD woman, old woman, shall we go a shearing?
Speak a little louder, sir, I am very thick of hearing.
Old woman, old woman, shall I love you dearly?
Thank you, kind sir, I hear you very clearly.


/ p.147 /

Illustrates poem CCLXV,  'Old mother Hubbard'.


p.154 ]

Illustration for Tenth Class, Games.

TENTH CLASS—GAMES

p.155 /

CCLXXVIII.
[A game of the Fox. In a children's game, where all the little actors are seated in a circle, the following stanza is used as question and answer.]
WHO goes round my house this night?
      None but cruel Tom!
Who steals all the sheep at night?
      None but this poor one.


/ p.156 /

CCLXXXI.
    [At the conclusion, the captive is privately asked if he will have oranges or lemons (the two leaders of the arch having previously agreed which designation shall belong to each), and he goes behind the one he may chance to name. When all are thus divided into two parties, they conclude the game by trying to pull each other beyond a certain line.]
GAY go up and gay go down,
To ring the bells of London town.

Bull's eyes and targets,
Say the bells of St. Marg'ret's.

Brickbats and tiles,
Say the bells of St. Giles'.

Halfpence and farthings,
Say the bells of St. Martin's.

Oranges and lemons,
Say the bells of St. Clement's.

p.157 /
Pancakes and fritters,
Say the bells of St. Peter's.

Two sticks and an apple,
Say the bells at Whitechapel.

Old Father Baldpate,
Say the slow bells at Aldgate.

You owe me ten shillings,
Say the bells at St. Helen's.

Pokers and tongs,
Say the bells at St. John's.

Kettles and pans,
Say the bells at St. Ann's.

When will you pay me?
Say the bells at Old Bailey.

When I grow rich,
Say the bells at Shoreditch.

Pray when will that be?
Say the bells of Stepney.

I am sure I don't know,
Says the great bell at Bow.


Here comes a candle to light you to bed,
And here comes a chopper to chop off your head.


/ p.158 /

CCLXXXIV.
AWAKE, arise, pull out your eyes,
    And here what time of day;
And when you have done, pull out your tongue,
    And see what you can say.


/ p.159 /

CCLXXXV.
GAME OF THE GIPSY.
    [One child is selected for Gipsy, one for Mother, and one for Daughter Sue. The Mother says,—
I CHARGE my daughters every one
To keep good house while I am gone.
You and you (points) but specially you,
[Or sometimes, but specially Sue.]
Or else I'll beat you black and blue.
During the Mother's absence, the Gipsy comes in, entices a child away, and hides her. This process is repeated till all the children are hidden, when the Mother has to find them.]


p.161 /

CCXC.
THERE were three jovial Welshmen,
    As I have heard them say,
And they would go a-hunting
    Upon St. David's day.

All the day they hunted,
    And nothing could they find
But a ship a-sailing,
    A-sailing with the wind.

p.162 /
One said it was a ship,
    The other he said, nay;
The third said it was a house,
    With the chimney blown away.

And all the night they hunted,
    And nothing could they find
But the moon a-gliding,
    A-gliding with the wind.

One said it was the moon,
    The other he said, nay;
The third said it was a cheese,
    And half o't cut away.

And all the day they hunted,
    And nothing could they find
But a hedgehog in a bramble bush
    And that they left behind.

The first said it was a hedgehog,
    The second he said, nay;
The third it was a pincushion,
    And the pins stuck in wrong way.

And all the night they hunted,
    And nothing could they find
But a hare in a turnip field,
    And that they left behind.

p.163 /
The first said it was a hare,
    The second he said, nay;
The third said it was a calf,
    And the cow had run away.

And all the day they hunted,
    And nothing could they find
But an owl in a holly tree,
    And that they left behind.

One said it was an owl,
    The other he said, nay;
The third said 'twas an old man,
    And his beard growing grey.


/ p.164 /

CCXCV.
SEE, saw, Margery Daw,
Sold her bed and lay upon straw;
Was not she a dirty slut,
To sell her bed and lie in the dirt!


/ p.174 /

CCCXXIV.
    [Children stand round, and are counted one by one, by means of this rhyme. The child upon whom the last number falls is out, for "Hide or Seek," or any other game where a victim is required. A cock and bull story of this kind is related of the historian Josephus. There are other versions of this, and one may be seen in 'Blackwood's Magazine' for August, 1821, p.36.]
HICKORY (1), Dickory, (2), Dock (3),
The mouse ran up the clock (4),
The clock struck one (5),
The mouse was gone (6);
O (7), U (8), T (9), spells OUT!


p.177 /

CCCXXXI.
HERE stands a post,
Who put it there?
A better man than you;
Touch it if you dare!


p.181 /

Illustrates poem CCCXXXVII. 'Here sits the Lord Mayor'.

p.182 /

CCCXXXVIII.
[A play with the face. The child exclaims:]
RING the bell! . . giving a lock of its hair a pull
Knock at the door! . . tapping its forehead.
Draw the latch! . . pulling up its nose.
And walk in! . . opening its mouth and putting in its finger.


p.183 /

CCCXLI.
[From Yorkshire. A game to alarm children.]
FLOWERS, flowers, high-do!
Sheeny, greeny, rino!—
      Sheeny greeny,
      Sheeny greeny,
Rum tum fra!

CCCXLII.
1.   THIS pig went to the barn.
2.   This eat all the corn.
3.   This said he would tell.
4.   This said he wasn't well.
5.   This went week, week, week, over the door sill.


p.184 /

[CCCXLVI.]
THE first day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
A partridge in a pear tree.

The second day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Two turtle doves and
A partridge in a pear tree.

p.185 /
The third day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

The fourth day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Four colly birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

The fifth day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Five gold rings,
Four colly birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

The sixth day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Six geese a laying,
Five gold rings,
Four colly birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

p.186 /
The seventh day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Seven swans a swimming,
Six geese a laying,
Five gold rings,
Four colly birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

The eighth day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Eight maids a milking,
Seven swans a swimming,
Six geese a laying,
Five gold rings,
Four colly birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

The ninth day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Nine drummers drumming,
Eight maids a milking,
Seven swans a swimming,
Six geese a laying,
Five gold rings,

p.187 /
Four colly birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

The tenth day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Ten pipers piping,
Nine drummers drumming,
Eight maids a milking,
Seven swans a swimming,
Six geese a laying,
Five gold rings,
Four colly birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

The eleventh day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Eleven ladies dancing,
Ten pipers piping,
Nine drummers drumming,
Eight maids a milking,
Seven swans a swimming,
Six geese a laying,
Five gold rings,
Four colly birds,

p.188 /
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

The twelfth day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Twelve lords a leaping,
Eleven ladies dancing,
Ten pipers piping,
Nine drummers drumming,
Eight maids a milking,
Seven swans a swimming,
Six geese a laying,
Five gold rings,
Four colly birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

    [Each child in succession repeats the gifts of the day, and forfeits for each mistake. This accumulative process is a favorite with children: in early writers, such as Homer, the repetition of messages, &c. pleases on the same principle.]


CCCXLVII.
[A game on the fingers.]
HEETUM peetum penny pie,
Populorum gingum gie;
East, West, North, South,
Kirby, Kendal, Cock him out!


p.189 /

CCCXLVIII.
[A game-rhyme.]
TRIP and go, heave and hoe,
Up and down, to and fro;
From the town to the grove
Two and two let us rove,
A-maying, a-playing;
Love hath no gainsaying;
So merrily trip and go,
So merrily trip and go!


CCCXLIX.
THIS is the way the ladies ride;
      Tri, tre, tre, tree,
      Tri, tre, tre, tree!
This is the way the ladies ride,
      Tri, tre, tre, tre, tri-tre-tre-tree!

This is the way the gentlemen ride;
      Gallop-a-trot,
      Gallop-a-trot!
This is the way the gentlemen ride,
      Gallop-a-gallop-a-trot!

This is the way the farmers ride;
      Hobbledy-hoy,
      Hobbledy-hoy!
This is the way the farmers ride,
      Hobbledy hobbledy-hoy!


p.190 /

CCCL.
THERE was a man, and his name was Dob,
And he had a wife, and her name was Mob,
And he had a dog, and he called it Cob,
And she had a cat, called Chitterabob.
Cob, says Dob,
Chitterabob, says Mob,
Cob was Dob's dog,
Chitterabob Mob's cat.


CCCLI.
[Two children sit opposite to each other; the first turns her fingers one over the other, and says:]
"MAY my geese fly over your barn?"

[The other answers, Yes, if they'll do no harm. Upon which the first unpacks the fingers of her hand, and waving it over head, says:]
"Fly over his barn and eat all his corn."


CCCLII.
NOW we dance looby, looby, looby,
Now we dance looby, looby, light,
Shake your right hand a little
And turn you round about.

Now we dance looby, looby, looby,
Shake your right hand a little,
Shake your left hand a little,
And turn you round about.

p.191 /
Now we dance looby, looby, looby,
Shake your right hand a little,
Shake your left hand a little,
Shake your right foot a little,
And turn you round about.

Now we dance looby, looby, looby,
Shake your right hand a little,
Shake your left hand a little,
Shake your right foot a little,
Shake your left foot a little,
And turn you round about.

Now we dance looby, looby, looby,
Shake your right hand a little,
Shake your left hand a little,
Shake your right foot a little,
Shake your left foot a little,
Shake your head a little,
And turn you round about.

[Children dance round first, then stop and shake the hand, &c. then turn slowly round, and then dance in a ring again.]


CCCLIII.
THE OLD DAME.
[One child, called the Old Dame, sits on the floor, and the rest, joining hands, form a circle round her, and dancing, sing the following lines:]
Children.To Beccles! to Beccles!
  To buy a bunch of nettles!
  Pray, old Dame, what's o'clock?
p.192 /
Dame.One, going for two.
Children.To Beccles! to Beccles!
  To buy a bunch of nettles!
  Pray, old Dame, what's o'clock?
Dame.Two, going for three.

    [And so on till she reaches, "Eleven going for twelve." After this the following questions are asked, with the replies. — C. Where have you been? D. To the wood. C. What for? D. To pick up sticks. C. What for? D. To light my fire. C. What for? D. To boil my kettle. C. What for? D. To cook some of your chickens. The children then all run away as fast as they can, and the Old Dame tries to catch one of them. Whoever is caught is the next to personate the Dame.]


CCCLIV.
DROP-GLOVE.
[Children stand round in a circle, leaving a space between each. One walks round the outside, and carries a glove in her hand, saying:]
I'VE a glove in my hand,
                    Hittity Hot!
Another in my other hand,
                    Hotter than that!
So I sow beans, and so they come up,
Some in a mug, and some in a cup.
I sent a letter to my love,
I lost it, I lost it!
I found it, I found it!
It burns, it scalds.
      [Repeating the last words very rapidly, till she drops the glove behind one of them, and whoever has the glove must overtake her, following her exactly in and out till she catches her. If the pursuer makes a mistake in the pursuit, she loses, and the game is over; otherwise she continues the game with the glove.]


p.193 /

CCCLVI.
THUMB bold,
Thibity-thold,
Langman,
Lick pan,
Mama's little man.


CCCLVII.
[A game of the fox.]
  FOX a fox, a brummalary,
How many miles to Lummaflary? Lummabary.
A. Eight and eight, and a hundred and eight.
How shall I get home to night?
A. Spin your legs, and run fast.


p.194 /

Illustration for poem CCLVIII. 'Here come I, Little David Doubt'.

p.195 /

CCCLIX.
[The following lines are said by the nurse when moving the child's foot up and down.]
THE dog of the kill,*
He went to the mill
    To lick mill-dust:
The miller he came
With a stick on his back,—
    Home, dog, home!
The foot behind,
    The foot before:
When he came to a stile,
    Thus he jumped o'er.

-----------------
*
That is, kiln.
-----------------


CCCLX.
[The following lines are repeated by the nurse when sliding her hand down the child's face.]
MY mother and your mother
    Went over the way;
Said my mother to your mother,
    It's chop-a-nose day!


p.196 ]

Illustration for Eleventh Class, Paradoxes

ELEVENTH CLASS—PARADOXES.


p.198 /

CCCLXV.
UP stairs, down stairs, upon my lady's window,
There I saw a cup of sack and a race of ginger;
Apples at the fire, and nuts to crack,
A little boy in the cream-pot up to his neck.


CCCLXVIII.
TOBACCO wick! tobacco wick!
When you're well, 'twill make you sick:
Tobacco wick! tobacco wick!
'Twill make you well when you are sick.


p.199 /

CCCLXX.
[The conclusion of the following resembles a verse in the nursery history of Mother Hubbard.]
THERE was an old woman, and what do you think?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink:
Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet;
This tiresome old woman could never be quiet.

She went to the baker, to buy her some bread,
And when she came home her old husband was dead;
She went to the clerk to toll the bell,
And when she came back her old husband was well.


p.201 /

CCCLXXV.
MY true love lives far from me,
      Perrie, Merrie, Dixie, Dominie.
Many a rich present he sends to me,
      Petrum, Partrum, Paradise, Temporie,
      Perrie, Merrie, Dixie, Dominie.
p.202 /
He sent me a goose, without a bone;
He sent me a cherry, without a stone.
                                                Petrum, &c.

He sent me a Bible, no man could read;
He sent me a blanket, without a thread.
                                                Petrum, &c.

How could there be a goose without a bone?
How could there be a cherry without a stone?
                                                Petrum, &c.

How could there be a Bible no man could read?
How could there be a blanket without a thread?
                                                Petrum, &c.

When the goose is in the egg-shell, there is no bone;
When the cherry is in the blossom, there is no stone.
                                                Petrum, &c.

When ye Bible is in ye press no man it can read;
When ye wool is on ye sheep's back, there is no thread.
                                                Petrum, &c.


p.205 ]

Illustration for Twelfth Class, Lullabies

TWELFTH CLASS—LULLABIES.


CCCLXXX.
H
USHY baby, my doll, I pray you don't cry,
And I'll give you some bread and some milk by and bye;
Or, perhaps you like custard, or may-be a tart,—
Then to either you're welcome, with all my whole heart.


p.210 ]

CCCXCVIII.
MY dear cockadoodle, my jewel, my joy,
My darling, my honey, my pretty sweet boy;
Before I do rock thee with soft lullaby,
Give me thy dear lips to be kiss'd, kiss'd, kiss'd.


p.211 ]

CCCXCIX.
[A favourite lullaby in the north of England fifty years ago, and perhaps still heard. The last word is pronounced bee.]
HUSH-A-BYE, lie still and sleep,
It grieves me sore to see thee weep,
For when thou weep'st thou wearies me,
Hush-a-bye, lie still and bye.


CCCC.
      [From Yorkshire and Essex. A nursery-cry.—It is also sometimes sung in the streets by boys who have small figures of wool, wood, or gypsum, &c of lambs to sell.]
YOUNG Lambs to sell!
Young Lambs to sell!
If I'd as much money as I can tell,
I never would cry—Young Lambs to sell!


CCCCI.
[From Yorkshire. A nursery-cry.]
RABBIT, Rabbit, Rabbit-Pie!
Come, my ladies, come and buy;
Else your babies they will cry.


CCCCII.
TO market, to market,
      To buy a plum cake;
Home again, home again,
      Ne'er a one baked;
The baker is dead and all his men,
And we must go to market again.



p.212 ]

CCCCIII.
ROCK well my cradle,
      And "bee baa," my son;
You shall have a new gown,
      When ye lord comes home.

Oh! still my child, Orange,
      Still him with a bell;
I can't still him, ladie,
      Till you come down yoursell!


CCCCIV.
WHERE was a sugar and fretty?
      And where was jewel and spicy?
Hush-a-bye, babe in a cradle,
      And we'll go away in a tricy!


p.213 ]

Illustration for Thirteenth Class, Jingles

THIRTEENTH CLASS—JINGLES.


p.215 /

CCCCIX.
DIDDLEDY, diddledy, dumpty;
The cat ran up the plum-tree.
      I'll lay you a crown
      I'll fetch you down;
So diddledy, diddledy, dumpty.


p.216 /

CCCCXIV.
SING jigmijole, the pudding-bowl,
    The table and the frame ;
My master he did cudgel me
    For speaking of my dame.

CCCCXV.
DEEDLE, deedle, dumpling, my son John
Went to bed with his trowsers on;
One shoe off, the other shoe on,
Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John.


p.217 /

CCCCXVIII.
      LITTLE Jack a Dandy
      Wanted sugar-candy,
And fairly for it cried;
      But little Billy Cook
      Who always reads his book,
Shall have a horse to ride.


p.220 /

CCCCXXVIII.
TWEEDLE-dum and tweedle-dee
      Resolved to have a battle,
For tweedle-dum said tweedle-dee
      Had spoiled his nice new rattle.
Just then flew by a monstrous crow,
      As big as a tar-barrel,
Which frightened both the heroes so,
      They quite forgot their quarrel.


p.222 /

CCCCXXXV.
ROMPTY-iddity, row, row, row,
If I had a good supper, I could eat it now.


CCCCXXXVIII.
    [Our collection of nursery songs may appropriately be concluded with the Quaker's commentary on one of the greatest favourites — Hey! diddle, diddle. We have endeavoured, as far as practicable, to remove every line from the present edition that could offend the most fastidious ear; but the following annotations on a song we cannot be induced to omit, would appear to suggest that our endeavours are scarely [lit.] likely to be attended with success.]
"HEY! diddle, diddle,
The cat and the fiddle"—
Yes, thee may say that, for that is nonsense.
p.223 /
      "The cow jumped over the moon"—

Oh no! Mary, thee musn't say that, for that is a falsehood; thee knows a cow could never jump over the moon; but a cow may jump under it; so thee ought to say—"The cow jumped under the moon."   Yes,—

      "The cow jumped under the moon;
      The little dog laughed"—

Oh Mary, stop. How can a little dog laugh? thee knows a little dog can't laugh. Thee ought to say —"The little dog barked— to see the sport,"
      "And the dish ran after the spoon"—

Stop, Mary, stop. A dish could never run after a spoon; thee ought to know that. Thee had better say—"And the cat ran after the spoon."   So,—

     "Hey! diddle, diddle,
The cat and the fiddle,
   The cow jump'd under the moon;
The little dog bark'd,
To see the sport,
   And the cat ran after the spoon!"


p.224 ]


FOURTEENTH CLASS—LOVE AND MATRIMONY.


p.225 /

CCCCXL.
BRAVE news is come to town,
    Brave news is carried;
Brave news is come to town,
    Jemmy Dawson's married.


p.232 /

CCCCLIX.
ROSEMARY green,
    And lavender blue,
Thyme and sweet marjorum,
    Hyssop and rue.


p.233 /

Illustration to poem CCCLXIV, 'Jack Sprat could eat no fat'


p.236 /

CCCCLXVII.
He. IF you with me will go, my love,
You shall see a pretty show, my love,
      Let dame say what she will:
If you will have me, my love,
I will have thee, my love,
      So let the milk-pail stand still.

She. Since you have said so, my love,
Longer I will go, my love,
      Let dame say what she will:
If you will have me, my love,
I will have thee, my love,
      So let the milk-pail stand still.


p.237 /

CCCCLXX.
I DOUBT, I doubt my fire is out
      My little wife isn't at home;
I'll saddle my dog, and I'll bridle my cat,
      And I'll go fetch my little wife home.


p.238 ]

Illustration for poem CCCCLXXI, 'Young Roger came tapping...


p.239 /

CCCCLXXII.
THOMAS and Annis met in the dark,
      "Good morning," said Thomas,
      "Good morning," said Annis.
And so they began to talk.

"I'll give you," says Thomas,
"Give me," said Annis;
      "I prithee, love, tell me what?"
"Some nuts," said Thomas,
"Some nuts," said Annis;
      "Nuts are good to crack."

"I love you," said Thomas.
"Love me!" said Annis;
      "I prithee love tell me where?"
"In my heart," said Thomas,
"In your heart!" said Annis;
      "How came you to love me there?"

"I'll marry you," said Thomas,
"Marry me!" said Annis;
      "I prithee, love, tell me when?"
"Next Sunday," said Thomas,
"Next Sunday," said Annis;
      "I wish next Sunday were come."


p.240 /

CCCCLXXIII.
SAW ye aught of my love a coming from ye market!
      A peck of meal upon her back,
      A babby in her basket;
Saw ye aught of my love a coming from the market?


p.243 /

CCCCLXXVII.
I MARRIED my wife by the light of the moon,
      A tidy housewife, a tidy one;
She never gets up until it is noon,
      And I hope she'll prove a tidy one.

And when she gets up, she is slovenly laced,
      A tidy, &c.
She takes up the poker to roll out the paste,
      And I hope, &c.

She churns her butter in a boot,
      A tidy, &c.
And instead of a churnstaff she puts in her foot,
      And I hope, &c.

She lays her cheese on the scullery shelf,
      A tidy, &c.
And she never turns it till it turns itself.
      And I hope, &c.


p.244 /

CCCCLXXX.
UP street, and down street,
    Each window's made of glass;
If you go to Tommy Tickler's house,
    You'll find a pretty lass.


p.246 /

CCCCLXXXIII.
[Cumberland courtship.]
BONNY lass, canny lass, willta be mine?
Thou'se neither wesh dishes, nor sarrah (serve) the swine,
Thou sall sit on a cushion, and sew up a seam,
And thou sall eat strawberries, sugar, and cream!


CCCCLXXXIV.
BESSY BELL and Mary Gray, *
    They were two bonny lasses:
They built their house upon the lea,
    And covered it with rashes.

Bessy kept the garden gate,
    And Mary kept the pantry :
Bessy always had to wait,
    While Mary lived in plenty.

    *  The common tradition respecting these celebrated beauties is as follows:—"In the year 1666, when the plague raged at Perth, these ladies retired into solitude, to avoid infection; built on a small streamlet, tributary to the Almond, in a sequestered corner called Burn-brae, a bower, and lived in it together, till a young man, whom they both tenderly loved, in his visits communicated to them the fatal contagion, of which they soon after died."


p.248 /

CCCCLXXXIX.
MARGARET wrote a letter,
Seal'd it with her finger,
Threw it in the dam
For the dusty miller.
Dusty was his coat,
Dusty was the siller,
Dusty was the kiss
I'd from the dusty miller.
If I had my pockets
Full of gold and siller,
I would give it all
To my dusty miller.
Chorus. O the little, little,
Rusty, dusty, miller.


CCCCXC.
LOVE your own, kiss your own,
      Love your own mother, hinny,
For if she was dead and gone,
      You'd ne'er get such another, hinny.


p.249 /

CCCCXCII.
    O RARE Harry Parry,
    When will you marry?
When apples and pears are ripe.
    I'll come to your wedding,
    Without any bidding,
And dance and sing all the night.


p.250 /

CCCCXCIII.
BLUE eye beauty,
Grey eye greedy,
Black eye blackie,
Brown eye brownie.



p.251 ]

Illustration for poem CCCXCV, 'The cuckoo's a fine bird'

FIFTEENTH CLASS—
N A T U R A L  H I S T O R Y.



p.252 /

CCCCXCVI.
[A provincial version of the same.]
THE cuckoo's a vine bird,
    A zengs as a vlies;
A brengs us good tidins,
    And tells us no lies;
A zucks th' smael birds' eggs,
    To make his voice clear;
And the mwore a cries "cuckoo!"
    The zummer draws near.


p.254 /

DI.
    LITTLE Poll Parrot
    Sat in his garret,
Eating toast and tea;
    A little brown mouse,
    Jumped into the house,
And stole it all away.


p.257 /

DXI.
CROAK! said the Toad, I'm hungry, I think,
To-day I've had nothing to eat or to drink,
I'll crawl to a garden and jump through the pales,
And there I'll dine nicely on slugs and on snails;
Ho, ho! quoth the Frog, is that what you mean?
Then I'll hop away to the next meadow stream,
There I will drink, and eat worms and slugs too,
And then I shall have a good dinner like you.


p.259 /

DXVIII.
WHEN the snow is on the ground,
    Little Robin Red-breast grieves;
For no berries can be found,
    And on the trees there are no leaves.

The air is cold, the worms are hid,
    For this poor bird what can be done?
We'll strew him here some crumbs of bread,
    And then he'll live till the snow is gone.


p.260 /

DXXI.
CUCKOO, Cuckoo,
What do you do?
In April
I open my bill;
In May
I sing night and day;
In June
I change my tune;
In July
Away I fly;
In August
Away I must.

DXXIII.
CATCH him, crow! carry him, kite!
Take him away till the apples are ripe;
When they are ripe and ready to fall,
Home comes [Johnny,] apples and all.


p.261 /

DXXVI.
PUSSY sat by the fire-side
In a basket full of coal-dust;
Bas-
ket,
Coal-
dust,
In a basket full of coal-dust !


p.264 /

DXXXV.
[Bird boy's song.]
EAT, Birds, eat, and make no waste,
I lie here and make no haste;
If my master chance to come,
You must fly, and I must run.


p.266 /

DXLIII.
COCK Robin got up early,
    At the break of day,
And went to Jenny's window,
    To sing a roundelay.

He sang Cock Robin's love
    To the pretty Jenny Wren,
And when he got unto the end,
    Then he began again.


DXLIV.
I HAD two pigeons bright and gay,
They flew from me the other day;
What was the reason they did go?
I cannot tell for I do not know.


p.268 /

DXLVIII.
THE robin and the wren,
They fought upon the parrage pan;
But ere the robin got a spoon,
The wren had eat the parrage down.


DXLIX.
LITTLE Bob Robin,
Where do you live?
Up in yonder wood, sir,
On a hazel twig.


DL.
THE winds they did blow,
    The leaves they did wag;
Along came a beggar boy,
    And put me in his bag.

He took me up to London,
    A lady did me buy,
Put me in a silver cage,
    And hung me up on high.

With apples by the fire,
    And nuts for to crack,
Besides a little feather bed
    To rest my little back


p.269 /

DLI.
I HAD a little cow, to save her,
I turned her into the meadow to graze her;
There came a heavy storm of rain,
And drove the little cow home again.
The church doors they stood open,
And there the little cow was cropen:
The bell-ropes they were made of hay,
And the little cow eat them all away:
The sexton came to toll the bell,
And pushed the little cow into the well!


DLII.
IN the month of February,
    When green leaves begin to spring,
Little lambs do skip like fairies,
    Birds do couple, build, and sing.


DLIII.
PUSSY sits behind the fire,
    How can she be fair?
In comes the little dog,
    Pussy, are you there?
So, so, Mistress Pussy,
    Pray how do you do?
Thank you, thank you, little dog,
    I'm very well just now.


p.270 /

DLIV.
THE dove says coo, coo, what shall I do?
I can scarce maintain two.
Pooh, pooh, says the wren, I have got ten,
And keep them all like gentlemen !


p.271 /
DLVIII.
BOBBIN-A-BOBBIN bent his bow,
And shot at a woodcock and kill'd a yowe:
The yowe cried ba, and he ran away,
But never came back 'till midsummer-day.


DLIX.
A LITTLE cock sparrow sat on a green tree, (tris)
And he cherruped, he cherruped so merry was he; (tris)
A little cock-sparrow sat on a green tree,
And he cherruped, he cherruped so merry was he.

A naughty bow came with his wee bow and arrow, (tris)
Determined to shoot this little cock sparrow, (tris)
A naughty, &c.
Determined, &c.

This little cock sparrow shall make me a stew, (tris)
And his giblets shall make me a little pie too, (tris)
Oh, no! said ye sparrow I won't make a stew,
So he flapped his wings and away he flew!


p.272 /

DLXII.
LADY bird, lady bird, fly away home,
Thy house is on fire, thy children all gone,
All but one, and her name is Ann,
And she crept under the pudding-pan.


p.273 /

DLXIII.
LITTLE Robin Redbreast sat upon a tree,
Up went Pussy cat, and down went he;
Down came Pussy cat, and away Robin ran;
Says little Robin Redbreast, "Catch me if you can."
Little Robin Redbreast jump'd upon a wall,
Pussy cat jump'd after him, and almost got a fall,
Little Robin chirp'd and sang, and what did Pussy say?
Pussy cat said "Mew," and Robin jump'd away.


DLXIV.
THERE was a little boy went into a barn,
    And lay down on some hay;
An owl came out and flew about,
    And the little boy ran away.


DLXV.
SNAIL, snail, shut out your horns ;
    Father and mother are dead:
Brother and sister are in the back yard,
    Begging for barley bread.


p.274 /

DLXVI.
I HAD a little hen, the prettiest ever seen,
She washed me the dishes, and kept the house clean:
She went to the mill to fetch me some flour;
She brought it home in less than an hour;
She baked me my bread, she brew'd me my ale,
She sat by the fire and told many a fine tale.


DLXVIII.
[A north country version of a very common nursery rhyme, sung by a child, who imitates the crowing of a cock.]
COCK-a-doodle-do,
My dad's gane to ploo;
Mammy's lost her pudding-poke,
And knows not what to do.


p.275 /

DLXIX.
HIGGLEPY Piggleby,
    My black hen,
She lays eggs
    For gentlemen;
Sometimes nine,
    And sometimes ten,
Higglepy Piggleby,
    My black hen!


DLXX.
    PRETTY John Watts,
    We are troubled with rats,
Will you drive them out of the house?
    We have mice, too, in plenty,
    That feast in the pantry;
    But let them stay,
    And nibble away;
What harm in a little brown mouse?


DLXXI.
    JACK SPRAT
    Had a cat,
It had but one ear;
    It went to buy butter,
When butter was dear.


p.276 /

DLXXIV.
HURLY, burly, trumpet trase,
The cow was in the market place,
Some goes far, and some goes near,
But where shall this poor henchman steer


DLXXV.
THERE was an old woman had three cows,
    Rosy, and Colin, and Dun;
Rosy and Colin were sold at the fair,
And Dun broke his head in a fit of despair
And there was an end of her three cows,
    Rosy, and Colin, and Dun.


p.277 /

DLXXVI.
I'LL away yhame,
And tell my dame,
That all my geese
Are gane but yane;
    And it's a steg (gander),
    And it's lost a leg;
And it'll be gane
By I get yhame.


DLXXVIII.
I LIKE little pussy, her coat is so warm,
And if I don't hurt her she'll do me no harm;
So I'll not pull her tail, nor drive her away,
But pussy and I very gently will play.


DLXXIX.
LITTLE cock robin peep'd out of his cabin,
To see the cold winter come in,
      Tit, for tat, what matter for that,
      He'll hide his head under his wing!


p.278 /

DLXXX.
THE pettitoes are little feet,
    And the little feet not big;
Great feet belong to the grunting hog,
    And the pettitoes to the little pig.


DLXXXI.
CHARLEY WARLEY had a cow,
Black and white about the brow;
Open the gate and let her go through,
Charley Warley's old cow !


DLXXXII.
          I HAD a little cow ;
          Hey-diddle, ho-diddle !
I had a little cow, and it had a little calf,
Hey-diddle, ho-diddle ; and there's my song half.

          I had a little cow;
          Hey-diddle, ho-diddle!
I had a little cow, and I drove it to the stall;
Hey-diddle, ho-diddle; and there's my song all !


p.281 /

DXCI.
GOOSY, goosy, gander,
Who stands yonder?
Little Betsy Baker;
Take her up, and shake her.


p.282 ]

Illustration for DXCII, 'I sell you the key of the king's garden

SIXTEENTH CLASS—
ACCUMULATIVE STORIES.


p.295 /

DXCVII.
TITTY MOUSE and Tatty Mouse both lived in a house,
Titty Mouse went a leasing, and Tatty Mouse went a leasing,
      So they both went a leasing.

Titty Mouse leased an ear of corn, and Tatty Mouse leased an ear of corn,
      So they both leased an ear of corn.

Titty Mouse made a pudding, and Tatty Mouse made a pudding,
      So they both made a pudding.

And Tatty Mouse put her pudding into the pot to boil,
But when Titty went to put her's in, the pot tumbled over, and scalded her to death.

      Then Tatty sat down and wept; then a three legged stool said, Tatty why do you weep? Titty's dead, said Tatty, and so I weep; then said the stool, I'll hop, so the stool hopped; then a besom in the corner of the room said, Stool, why do you hop? Oh! said the stool, Titty's dead, and Tatty p.296 / weeps, and so I hop; then said the besom, I'll sweep, so the besom began to sweep; then said the door, Besom, why do you sweep? Oh! said the besom, Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, and the stool hops, and so I sweep; then said the door, I'll jar, so the door jarred; then said the window, Door, why do you jar? Oh! said the door, Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, and the stool hops, and the besom sweeps, and so I jar; then said the window, I'll creak, so the window creaked; now there was an old form outside the house, and when the window creaked, the form said, Window, why do you creak? Oh! said the window, Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, and the stool hops, and the besom sweeps, the door jars, and so I creak; then said the old form, I'll run round the house, then the old form ran round the house; now there was a fine large walnut tree growing by the cottage, and the tree said to the form, Form, why do you run round the house? Oh! said the form, Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, and the stool hops, and the besom sweeps, the door jars, and the window creaks, and so I run round the house; then said the walnut p.297 / tree, I'll shed my leaves, so the walnut tree shed all its beautiful green leaves; now there was a little bird perched on one of the boughs of the tree, and when all the leaves fell, it said, Walnut tree, why do you shed your leaves? Oh! said the tree, Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, the stool hops, and the besom sweeps, the door jars, and the window creaks, the old form runs round the house, and so I shed my leaves; then said the little bird, I'll moult all my feathers, so he moulted all his pretty feathers; now there was a little girl walking below, carrying a jug of milk for her brothers' and sisters' supper, and when she saw the poor little bird moult all its feathers, she said, Little bird, why do you moult all your feathers? Oh! said the little bird, Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, the stool hops, and the besom sweeps, the door jars, and the window creaks, the old form runs round the house, the walnut tree sheds its leaves, and so I moult all my feathers; then said the little girl, I'll spill the milk, so she dropt the pitcher and spilt the milk; now there was an old man just by on the top of a ladder thatching a rick, and when he saw the little girl spill the milk, he p.298 / said, Little girl, what do you mean by spilling the milk, your little brothers and sisters must go without their supper; then said the little girl, Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, the stool hops, and the besom sweeps, the door jars, and the window creaks, the old form runs round the house, the walnut tree sheds all its leaves, the little bird moults all its feathers, and so I spill the milk; Oh! said the old man, then I'll tumble off the ladder and break my neck, so he tumbled off the ladder and broke his neck; and when the old man broke his neck, the great walnut tree fell down with a crash, and upset the old form and house, and the house falling knocked the window out, and the window knocked the door down, and the door upset the besom, the besom upset the stool, and poor little Tatty Mouse was buried beneath the ruins.




p.299 ]

Illustration for DXCVIII, 'There was a little nobby colt'

SEVENTEENTH CLASS—LOCAL.


p.302 /

DCX.
LITTLE lad, little lad, where wast thou born?
Far off in Lancashire, under a thorn,
Where they sup sour milk in a ram's horn.


p.303 ]


EIGHTEENTH CLASS—RELICS.


p.312 /

DCXLV.
WASH, hands, wash,
    Daddy's gone to plough,
If you want your hands wash'd,
    Have them wash'd now.
    [A formula for making young children submit to the operation of having their hands washed. Mutatis mutandis, the lines will serve as a specific for everything of the kind, as brushing hair, &c.]


/  p.315 /

DCLV.
JACKY, come give me thy fiddle
    If ever thou mean to thrive;
Nay, I'll not give my fiddle,
    To any man alive.

If I should give my fiddle,
    They'll think that I'm gone mad,
For many a joyful day
    My fiddle and I have had.


DCLVI.
BLENKY my nutty-cock,
    Blenk him away;
My nutty-cock's never
    Been blenk'd to-day.
What wi' carding and spinning on't wheel,
We've never had time to blenk nutty-cock weel;
But let to-morrow come ever so sune,
My nutty-cock it sall be blenk'd by nune.


DCLVII.
TO market, to market, to buy a plum-cake,
Back again, back again, baby is late;
To market, to market, to buy a plum-bun,
Back again, back again, market is done.


p.316 /

DCLIX.
HOW do you do, neighbour?
Neighbour, how do you do?
    I am pretty well,
And how does Cousin Sue do?
    She's pretty well,
And sends her duty to you,
    So does bonnie Nell.
Good lack, how does she do?

p.317 ]



Page
A, B, C, and D.....16
A, B, C, tumble down D......14
About the bush, Willy....91
A carrion crow sat on an oak....115
A cat came fiddling out of a barn....219
A cow and a calf.....228
A diller, a dollar......76
A dog and a cock......61
A duck and a drake.....164
A for the ape, that we saw at the fair......20
A good child, a good child.....314
A guinea it would sink.....74
A kid, a kid, my father bought....288
A little cock sparrow sat on a green tree....271
A little old man and I fell out....144
A little old man of Derby....153
All of a row......258
A long-tail'd pig, or a short-tail'd pig...262
A man of words and not of deeds......70
A man of words and not of deeds......71
A man went a hunting at Reigate.....301
A pie sat on a pear-tree...... 259
Apple-pie, pudding, and pancake..... 16
A pretty little girl in a round-eared cap..... 92
A pullet in the pen.... 71
A riddle, a riddle, as I suppose ...... 132

p. 318 /
Page
Around the green gravel the grass grows green....314
Arthur O'Bower has broken his band123
As I look'd out o' my chamber window....120
As I walk'd by myself.....
As I was going along, long, long.....
As I was going by Charing Cross.....
As I was going o'er London Bridge.....
As I was going o'er London Bridge.....
As I was going o'er Tipple Tine.....
As I was going o'er Westminster Bridge.....
As I was going to St. Ives.....
As I was going to sell my eggs.....
As I was going up Pippen-hill.....
As I was going up the hill.....
As I was walking o'er Little Moorfields.....
As I went over Lincoln Bridge.....
As I went over the water.....
As I went over the water.....
As I went through the garden gap.....
As I went to Bonner.....
As round as an apple, as deep as a cup.....
As soft as silk, as white as milk.....
As the days grow longer.....
As the days lengthen.....
As titty mouse sat in the witty to spin.....
As Tommy Snooks and Bessy Brooks.....
Astra Dabit Dominus, Gratisque Beabit Egenos.....
A sunshiny shower.....
A swarm of bees in May.....
At Brill on the Hill.....
At Dover dwells George Brown Esquire.....
A thatcher of Thatchwood went to Thatchet a thatching.....
At the siege of Belle-isle.....
Awake, arise, pull out your eyes.....
Awa', birds, away!.....
A was an apple-pie.....
A was an archer, and shot at a frog.....

Baby and I.....
Bah, bah, black sheep.....
Barber, barber, shave a pig.....
Barnaby Bright he was a sharp cut.....

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p.319 /
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Barney Bodkin broke his nose.....
Bat, bat.....
Bessy Bell and Mary Gray.....
Betty Pringle had a little pig.....
Birch and green holly, boys.....
Birds of a feather flock together.....
Black we are, but much admired.....
Black within, and red without.....
Blenky my nutty-cock.....
Blow, wind, blow! and go, mill, go!.....
Blue eye beauty.....
Bonny lass, canny lass, wilta be mine?.....
Bounce Buckram, velvet's dear.....
Bow, wow, wow.....
Brave news is come to town.....
Bryan O'Lin, and his wife, and wife's mother.....
Buff says Buff to all his men.....
Burnie bee, burnie bee.....
Buz, quoth the blue fly.....
Bye, baby bumpkin.....
Bye, baby bunting.....
Bye, O my baby.....

Can you make me a cambric shirt.....
Catch him, crow! carry him, kite!.....
Charley wag.....
Charley Warley had a cow.....
Clap hands, clap hands.....
Clap hands, clap hands !.....
Cock a doodle doo.....
Cock-a-doodle-do.....
Cock Robin got up early.....
Come, butter, come.....
Come dance a jig.....
Come, let's to bed.....
Come when you're called.....
Congeal'd water and Cain's brother.....
Cripple Dick upon a stick.....
Croak! said the Toad, I'm hungry, I think.....
Cross patch.....
Cuckoo, cherry tree.....
Curly locks ! curly locks! wilt thou be mine?.....

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p.320 /
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Curr dhoo, curr dhoo.....
Cuckoo, Cuckoo.....
Cushy cow bonny, let down thy milk.....

Daffy-down-dilly has come up to town.....
Dame, get up and bake your pies.....
Dame, what makes your ducks to die?.....
Dance, little baby, dance up high.....
Dance, Thumbkin, dance.....
Dance to your daddy.....
Danty baby diddy.....
Darby and Joan were dress'd in black.....
Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John.....
Dibbity, dibbity, dibbity, doe.....
Dick and Tom, Will and John.....
Dickery, Dickery, dare.....
Did you see my wife, did you see, did you see.....
Diddledy, diddledy, dumpty.....
Dig, dong, bell.....
Dig, dong, darrow.....
Doctor Faustus was a good man.....
Doodle, doodle, doo.....
Doddledy, doodledy, doodledy, dan.....
Draw a pail of water.....
Driddlety drum, driddlety drum.....

Eat, birds, eat, and make no waste.....
Eggs, butter, bread.....
Eighty-eight wor Kirby feight.....
Elizabeth, Elspeth, Betsy and Bess.....
Elsie Marley is grown so fine.....
Every lady in this land.....
Eye winker.....

Father Iohnson Nicholas Iohnson's Son.....
Father Short came down the lane.....
Feedum, diffledum fee.....
F for fig, J for Jig.....
Fiddle-de-dee, fiddle-de-dee.....
Flour of England, fruit of Spain.....
Flowers, flowers, high-do.....

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p.321 /
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Formed long ago, yet made to-day.....
For every evil under the sun.....
Four and twenty tailors went to kill a snail.....
Fox, a fox, a lummalary.....
Friday night's dream.....

Gay go up and gay go down.....
Gilly silly Jarter.....
Girls and boys came out to play.....
Give me a blow, and I'll beat 'em.....
Good horses, bad horses.....
Good Queen Bess was a glorious dame.....
Goosey, goosey, gander.....
Goosy, goosy, gander.....
Go to bed first, a golden purse.....
Go to bed Tom!.....
Gray goose and gander.....
Great A, little a.....
Green cheese, yellow laces.....

Handy Spandy, Jack a dandy.....
Hannah Bantry in the pantry
Hark, hark.....
Hector Protector was dressed all in green.....
Heetum peetum penny pie.....
Hemp-seed I set.....
Here am I, little jumping Joan.....
Here come I.....
Here comes a lusty wooer.....
Here comes a poor woman from baby-land.....
Here goes my lord.....
Here sits the Lord Mayor.....
Here stands a post.....
Here we come a piping.....
He that goes to see his wheat in May.....
He that would thrive.....
Hey! diddle, diddle.....
Hey diddle, dinketty, poppety, pet.....
Hey ding a ding, what shall I sing?.....
Hey, dorolot, dorolot
Hey, my kitten, my kitten.....
Hick-a-more, Hack-a-more.....

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p.322 /
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Hic, hoc, the carrion crow.....
Hickery, dickery, 6 and 7.....
Hickety, pickety, my black hen.....
Hickory (1), Dickory (2), Dock (3).....
Hickup, hickup, go away.....
Hickup, snicup.....
Hie hie, says Anthony.....
Higglepy, Piggleby.....
Higgledy piggledy.....
High diddle ding.....
High diddle doubt, my candle out.....
High ding a ding, and ho ding a ding.....
High, ding, cockatoo-moody.....
Higher than a house, higher than a tree.....
Highty cock O!.....
Highty, tighty, paradighty clothed in green.....
Hink, minx! the old witch winks.....
Ho! Master Teague, what is your story?.....
Hot-cross Buns!.....
How d' 'e dogs, how? whose dog art thou?.....
How does my lady's garden grow?.....
How do you do, neighbour.....
How many days has my baby to play?.....
How many miles is it to Babylon?.....
Hub a dub dub.....
Humpty Dumpty lay in a beck.....
Humpty Dumpty sate on a wall.....
Hurly, burly, trumpet trase.....
Hush-a-bye a ba lamb.....
Hush-a-bye, baby, on the tree top.....
Hush-a-bye, lie still and sleep.....
Hushy baby, my doll, I pray you don't cry.....
Hush, hush, hush, hush.....
Hussy, hussy, where's your horse?.....
Hush thee, my babby.....
Hyder iddle diddle dell.....

I am a gold lock.....
I am a pretty wench.....
I can make diet bread.....
I doubt, I doubt my fire is out.....
I can weave diaper thick, thick, thick.....

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p.323 /
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I charge my daughters every one.....
If a body meet a body.....
If all the world was apple-pie.....
If all the seas were one sea.....
If a man who turnips cries.....
If I'd as much money as I could spend.....
If ifs and ands.....
If wishes were horses.....
If you love me, pop and fly.....
If you sneeze on Monday, you sneeze for danger.....
If you with me will go, my love.....
I had a little castle upon the sea-side.....
I had a little cow.....
I had a little cow, to save her.....
I had a little dog, and his name was Blue Bell.....
I had a little dog, and they called him Buff.....
I had a little hen, the prettiest ever seen.....
I had a little hobby-horse, and it was well shod.....
I had a little husband.....
I had a little moppet.....
I had a little nut tree, nothing would it bear.....
I had a little pony.....
I had two pigeons bright and gay.....
I have a little sister, they call her peep, peep.....
I have been to market, my lady, my lady.....
I like little pussy, her coat is so warm.....
I'll away yhame.....
I'll buy you a tartan bonnet.....
I'll sing you a song.....
I'll tell you a story.....
I lost my mare in Lincoln Lane.....
I love my love with an A, because he's Agreeable.....
I love sixpence, pretty little sixpence.....
I married my wife by the light of the moon.....
In Arthur's court, Tom Thumb did live.....
In fir tar is.....
In July.....
In marble walls as white as milk.....
Intery, mintery, cutery-corn.....
In the month of February.....
I saw a peacock with a fiery tail.....
I saw a ship a-sailing.....
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p.324 /
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I sell you the key of the king's garden.....
Is John Smith within ?.....
It's once I courted as pretty a lass.....
I've a glove in my hand.....
I went into my grandmother's garden.....
I went to the toad that lies under the wall.....
I went to the wood and got it.....
I went up one pair of stairs.....
I won't be my father's Jack.....
I would if I cou'd.....

Jack and Jill went up the hill.....
Jack be nimble.....
Jack in the pulpit, out and in.....
Jack Sprat.....
Jack Sprat could eat no fat.....
Jack Sprat's pig.....
Jacky, come give me thy fiddle.....
Jacky, come give me thy fiddle.....
Jeanie, come tie my.....
Jim and George were two great lords.....
John Ball shot them all.....
John, come sell thy fiddle.....
John Cook had a little grey mare; he, haw, hum !.....
Johnny Armstrong kill'd a calf.....
Johnny shall have a new bonnet.....

King's Sutton is a pretty town.....

Lady bird, lady bird, fly away home.....
Lady-cow, lady-cow, fly thy way home.....
Legomoton.....
Leg over leg.....
Lend me thy mare to ride a mile?.....
Let us go to the wood, says this pig.....
Little Bob Robin.....
Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep.....
Little boy blue, come blow up your horn.....
Little boy, pretty boy, where was you born ?.....
Little cock robin peep'd out of his cabin.....
Little Dicky Dilver.....

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p.325 /
Page
Little General Monk.....
Little girl, little girl, where have you been ?.....
Little Jack a dandy.....
Little Jack Dandy prat was my first suitor.....
Little Jack Jingle.....
Little Jack Horner sat in the corner.....
Little John Jiggy Jag.....
Little King Boggen he built a fine hall.....
Little lad, little lad, where wast thou born?.....
Little maid, pretty maid, whither goest thou ?.....
Little Mary Ester.....
Little Nancy Etticoat.....
Little Poll Parrot.....
Little Robin Red-breast.....
Little Robin Red-breast.....
Little Robin Redbreast sat upon a tree.....
Little Tee wee.....
Little Tom Dandy.....
Little Tom Dogget.....
Little Tommy Tacket.....
Little Tommy Tittlemouse.....
Little Tom Tittlemouse.....
Little Tom Tucker.....
Lives in winter.....
Lock the dairy door.....
London bridge is broken down.....
Long Legs, crooked thighs.....
Love your own, kiss your own.....

Madam, I am come to court you.....
Made in London.....
Make three-fourths of a cross.....
Margaret wrote a letter.....
Margery Mutton-pie, and Johnny Bopeep.....
Master I have, and I am his man.....
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.....
May my geese fly over your barn ?.....
Merry are the bells, and merry would they ring.....
Miss one, two, and three could never agree.....
Mistress Mary, quite contrary.....
Moss was a little man, and a little mare did buy.....
Multiplication is vexation.....

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p.326 /
Page
My dear cockadoodle, my jewel, my joy.....
My dear, do you know.....
My father and mother.....
My father he died, but I can't tell you how.....
My father he left me, just as he was able.....
My father left me three acres of land.....
My father was a Frenchman.....
My grandmother sent me a new-fashioned, &c......
My lady Wind, my lady Wind.....
My little old man and I fell out.....
My maid Mary.....
My mother and your mother.....
My story's ended.....
My true love lives far from me.....

Nature requires five.....
Needles and pins, needles and pins.....
Now we dance, looby, looby, looby.....
Number number nine, this hoop's mine.....

Of all the gay birds that e'er I did see.....
Oh, dear, what can the matter be ?.....
Oh ! mother, I shall be married to Mr. Punchinello.....
Oh, where are you going.....
Old Abram Brown is dead and gone.....
Old Betty Blue.....
Old father Graybeard.....
Old Father of the Pye.....
Old King Cole.....
Old Mother Goose, when.....
Old mother Hubbard.....
Old Mother Niddity Nod swore by the pudding-bag.....
Old Sir Simon the king.....
Old mother Twitchett had but one eye.....
Old woman, old woman, shall we go a shearing?.....
Once I saw a little bird.....
Once upon a time there was an old sow.....
On Christmas eve I turn'd the spit.....
One, 2, 3, 4, 5.....
One-ery, two-ery.....
One-ery, two-ery, hickary, hum.....
One misty moisty morning.....

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p.327 /
Page
One moonshiny night.....
One's none.....
One old Oxford ox opening oysters.....
One to make ready.....
One, two.....
One, two, three.....
On Saturday night.....
O rare Harry Parry.....
O that I was where I would be.....
O the little rusty, dusty, rusty miller.....
Our saucy boy Dick.....
Over the water, and over the lee.....

Pancakes and fritters.....
Parson Darby wore a black gown.....
Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man !.....
Pease-porridge hot, pease-porridge cold.....
Pease-pudding hot.....
Peg, Peg, wish a wooden leg.....
Pemmy was a pretty girl.....
Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper.....
Peter White will ne'er go right.....
Pit, Pat, well-a-day.....
Pitty Patty Polt.....
Please to remember.....
Polly, put the kettle on.....
Poor old Robinson Crusoe !.....
Pretty John Watts.....
Punch and Judy.....
Purple, yellow, red, and green.....
Pussey cat sits by the fire.....
Pussicat, wussicat, with a white foot.....
Pussy cat eat the dumplings, the dumplings.....
Pussy cat Mole.....
Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, where have you been.....
Pussy sat by the fire-side.....
Pussy sits behind the fire.....

Queen Anne, queen Anne, you sit in the sun.....

Rabbit, Rabbit, Rabbit-Pie.....
Rain, Rain, go away .....

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p.328 /
Page
Riddle me, riddle me, ree.....
Ride a cock-horse to Banbury-cross.....
Ride a cock-horse to Banbury-cross.....
Ride a cock-horse to Banbury-cross.....
Ride a cock-horse to Coventry-cross.....
Ride baby, ride.....
Ring me (1), ring me (2), ring me rary (3).....
Ring the bell !.....
Robert Barnes, fellow fine.....
Robert Rowley rolled a round roll round.....
Robin-a-Bobin bent his bow.....
Robin and Richard were two pretty men.....
Robin Hood, Robin Hood.....
Robin the Bobbin, the big-bellied Ben.....
Rock-a-bye, baby, thy cradle is green.....
Rock well my cradle.....
Rompty-iddity, row, row, row.....
Rosemary green.....
Round about, round about.....
Rowley Powley, pudding and pie.....
Rowsty dowt, my fire's all out.....

Saw ye aught of my love a coming from ye market.....
Says t'auld man tit oak tree.....
See a pin and pick it up.....
See, saw, Margery Daw.....
See, saw, Margery Daw.....
See, saw, Margery Daw.....
See, saw, sack-a-day.....
See-saw, jack a daw.....
See-saw sacradown.....
See, see? what shall I see?.....
Shake a leg, wag, a leg, when will you gang.....
Shoe the colt.....
Shoe the colt, shoe !.....
Sieve my lady's oatmeal.....
Simple Simon met a pieman.....
Sing a song of sixpence.....
Sing jigmijole, the pudding-bowl.....
Sing, sing, what shall I sing ?.....
Solomon Grundy.....
Some little mice sat in a barn to spin.....

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p.329 /
Page
Some up, and some down.....
Snail, snail, come out of your hole.....
Snail, snail, put out your horns.....
Snail, snail, shut out your horns.....
Sneel, snaul.....
Speak when you're spoken to.....
St. Swithin's day, if thou dost rain.....
St. Thomas's-day is past and gone.....
Swan swam over the sea.....
Sylvia, sweet as morning air.....

Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a thief.....
Tell tale, tit !.....
Ten and ten and twice eleven.....
The art of good driving 's a paradox quite.....
The barber shaved the mason.....
The cat sat asleep by the side of the fire.....
The cock doth crow.....
The cuckoo's a fine bird.....
The cuckoo's a vine bird.....
The dog of the kill.....
The dove says coo, coo, what shall I do ?.....
The fair maid who, the first of May.....
The first day of Christmas.....
The fox and his wife they had a great strife.....
The girl in the lane, that couldn't speak plain.....
The king of France, and four thousand men.....
The king of France, the king of France, with forty.....
      thousand men.....
The king of France went up the hill.....
The king of France, with twenty thousand men.....
The keys of Canterbury.....
The lion and the unicorn.....
The little priest of Felton.....
The man in the moon.....
The mackerel's cry.....
The man in the moon drinks claret.....
The man in the wilderness asked me.....
The moon nine days old.....
The north wind doth blow.....
The old woman and her pig.....
The pettitoes are little feet.....

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p.330 /
Page
The quaker's wife got up to bake.....
There once was a gentleman grand.....
There was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile.....
There was a fat man of Bombay.....
There was a frog lived in a well.....
There was a girl in our towne.....
There was a jolly miller.....
There was a king, and he had three daughters.....
There was a king met a king.....
There was a little boy and a little girl.....
There was a little boy went into a barn.....
There was a little Guinea-pig.....
There was a little maid, and she was afraid.....
There was a little man.....
There was a little nobby colt.....
There was a little one-eyed gunner.....
There was a little pretty lad.....
There was a man, and he had naught.....
There was a man and he was mad.....
There was a man, and his name was Dob.....
There was a man in our toone, in our toone, in our
      toone.....
There was a man of Newington.....
There was a man rode through our town.....
There was a man who had no eyes.....
There was a monkey climb'd up a tree.....
There was an old crow.....
There was an old man.....
There was an old man of Tobago.....
There was an old man who liv'd in Middle Row.....
There was an old man, who lived in a wood.....
There was an old woman.....
There was an old woman, and what do you think ?.....
There was an old woman, as I've heard tell.....
There was an old woman called Nothing-at-all.....
There was an old woman had nothing.....
There was an old woman had three cows.....
There was an old woman had three sons.....
There was an old woman, her name it was Peg.....
There was an old woman in Surrey.....
There was an old woman of Leeds.....
There was an old woman of Norwich.....
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p.331 /
Page
There was an old woman sat spinning.....
There was an old woman toss'd up in a basket.....
There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.....
There was an owl lived in an oak.....
There was a piper, he'd a cow.....
There were three jovial Welshmen.....
There were three sisters in a hall.....
There were two birds sat on a stone.....
There were two blackbirds.....
The robin and the wren.....
The rose is red, the grass is green.....
The sow came in with the saddle.....
The tailor of Bicester.....
The white dove sat on the castle wall.....
The winds, they did blow.....
They that wash on Monday.....
Thirty days hath September.....
Thirty white horses upon a red hill.....
This is the house that Jack built.....
This is the key of the kingdom.....
This is the way the ladies ride.....
This pig went to market.....
This pig went to the barn.....
Thomas and Annis met in the dark.....
Thomas a Tattamus took two T's.....
Three blind mice, see how they run !.....
Three children sliding on the ice.....
Three crooked cripples went through Cripplegate.....
Three straws on a staff.....
Three wise men of Gotham.....
Thumb bold.....
Thumbikin, Thumbikin, broke the barn.....
Tiddle liddle lightum.....
Tip, top, tower.....
Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse.....
Tobacco wick ! tobacco wick !.....
To Beccles ! to Beccles !.....
To make your candles last for a'.....
To market ride the gentlemen.....
To market, to market.....
To market, to market, a gallop, a trot.....
To market, to market, to buy a fat pig.....
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p.332 /
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To market, to market, to buy a plum-cake.....
Tom Brown's two little Indian boys.....
Tom he was a piper's son.....
Tommy kept a chandler's shop.....
Tommy Trot a man of law.....
Tom shall have a new bonnet.....
Tom, Tom, the piper's son.....
Trip and go, heave and hoe.....
Trip trap over the grass.....
Trip upon trenchers, and dance upon dishes.....
'Twas the twenty-ninth of May, 'Twas a holiday.....
Tweedle-dum and tweedle-dee.....
Twelve huntsmen with horns and hounds.....
Twelve pears hanging high.....
Two broken tradesmen.....
Two legs sat upon three legs.....

Wash hands, wash.....
We are three brethren out of Spain.....
Weave the diaper tick-a-tick tick.....
We make no spare.....
We're all dry with drinking on't.....
We're all in the dumps.....
What are little boys made of.....
What care I how black I be.....
What do thay call you ?.....
What is the rhyme for poringer ?.....
What shoe-maker makes shoes without leather.....
What's the news of the day.....
When a Twister a twisting will twist him a twist.....
When good king Arthur ruled this land.....
When I was a little boy, I had but little wit.....
When I was a little girl, about seven years old.....
When I was taken from the fair body.....
When I went up sandy hill.....
When Jacky's a very good boy.....
When shall we be married.....
When the sand doth feed the clay.....
When the snow is on the ground.....
When the wind is in the east.....
When V and I together meet.....
Where are you going, my pretty maid ?.....

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159
124
171
131

312
178
166
4
230
306
304
226
255
10
126
306
137
2
81
62
120
134
311
229
75
259
70
78
107


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Where have you been all the day.....
Where have you been to-day, Billy, my son.....
Where was a sugar and fretty.....
Whistle, daughter, whistle, whistle, daughter dear.....
Who comes here ?.....
Who goes round my house this night ?.....
Who is going round my sheepfold ?.....
Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you going.....
Willy, Willy Wilkin.....
William and Mary, George and Anne.....
Wooley Foster has gone to sea.....
Whoop, whoop, and hollow.....

Up at Piccadilly oh !.....
Up hill and down dale.....
Up stairs, down stairs, upon my lady's window.....
Up street, and down street.....

Yeow mussent sing a' Sunday.....
Young Roger came tapping at Dolly's window.....
Young lambs to sell.....
You shall have an apple.....

226
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212
117
313
155
173
307
225
10
105
167

89
231
198
244

73
238
211
89



p.334 ]


DALZIEL BROTHERS, CAMDEN PRESS, N.W.






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